Social and religious life in Viking armies / La vie sociale et religieuse au sein des armées vikings

Lesley Abrams


Cet article fait partie du dossier « Bandes de guerriers et clientèles armées », atelier organisé le vendredi 7 décembre 2018 à l’Université de Caen Normandie par le Centre Michel de Boüard (Craham UMR 6273). https://craham.hypotheses.org/category/bandes-de-guerriers


Représentation d’un guerrier sur un fût de croix (Middleton 5A) de l’église de Middleton, North Yorkshire, probablement Xe siècle. © Lesley Abrams.

In the Viking Age (from approximately the 790s to the mid/late eleventh century), mobile units made up of military men, their families, and other non-combatants were a consistent presence in Francia, Britain, and Ireland. The earliest Viking armed groups were very different from those that conquered England in 1016. My particular focus for this workshop was on the mid to late ninth century, a time when many Viking armies spent years on the road. They were independent entities, not state-based, in pursuit of wealth and power, that existed in politically volatile landscapes, splitting and regrouping as the occasion demanded, making and breaking alliances with local regimes.

It is difficult but important to distinguish these armed groups from their settled compatriots (in early Normandy and the English Danelaw, for example). Unfortunately, there is no testimony from within the armies, as Scandinavians did not write extended texts at this time; so we have only the Christian side of the story, which was preserved in annals, saints’ lives, and other narrative sources. However, material evidence has increased substantially in recent years and helped to reconfigure perceptions of these armies. Christian sources had reasons to stress the Vikings’ aggressive character, but archaeology is increasingly revealing a more pacific side, involving trade and other non-violent interactions with locals. In particular, investigations at Repton, Torksey, and ARSNY (“A Riverine Site in North Yorkshire”) have exposed winter camps in northern England occupied by the so-called Great Army (c. 865-880). There is (in my view) no denying the violent side of Viking activity. But finds now show that while they were in their camps members of the army were processing and manufacturing metal artefacts and ingots; repairing ships and weapons; gambling and gaming; and trading, using both bullion and coins (some of which they may have minted themselves).

My paper at the workshop aimed to animate the sites of these ninth-century Viking camps with living behaviour by considering the social dimension of the armies. It asked to what extent these groups, although on the road and away from home for many decades, reflected the socio-political structures of the Scandinavian homelands from which they came, and how they adapted to life on the move. This was a very speculative exercise.

One aspect considered was the internal workings of these small societies, focussing in particular on the use of oaths outside the better known military and commercial situations, i.e. in the everyday operation of an oral society, where bearing witness through oaths was how legal proof was enacted. Even in armies there would presumably have been disputes to be resolved, inheritance issues to be sorted, and compensation to be calculated and paid, and it is worth asking whether there might have been a designated legal expert, or an area set aside for assembly and legal business in the temporary camps. One question raised by considering comparative material from Scandinavia was whether an individual’s freedom was more constrained in the army on the road than at home.

My paper at the workshop aimed to animate the sites of these ninth-century Viking camps with living behaviour by considering the social dimension of the armies. It asked to what extent these groups, although on the road and away from home for many decades, reflected the socio-political structures of the Scandinavian homelands from which they came, and how they adapted to life on the move. This was a very speculative exercise. One aspect considered was the internal workings of these small societies, focussing in particular on the use of oaths outside the better known military and commercial situations, i.e. in the everyday operation of an oral society, where bearing witness through oaths was how legal proof was enacted. Even in armies there would presumably have been disputes to be resolved, inheritance issues to be sorted, and compensation to be calculated and paid, and it is worth asking whether there might have been a designated legal expert, or an area set aside for assembly and legal business in the temporary camps. One question raised by considering comparative material from Scandinavia was whether an individual’s freedom was more constrained in the army on the road than at home.

Another theme was religious practice, and how, in the absence of the kind of infrastructure developed and used by settled populations in the homelands (regional cult sites and ancestral burials, for example), traditional religious practice may have continued in an army setting. I discussed various aspects of everyday life where religion would have been in play, including sacrifices (evidenced by weapon deposits and other archaeology), oaths, rituals to mark births, marriages, and deaths (where the evidence from Repton’s mass grave suggests that armies invented new rituals in the absence of traditional family cemeteries), amulets, and skaldic poetry (verses about gods and goddesses that articulated martial values). Constructing the outlines of a religious life with these building blocks raised several questions: if shared religion helps to support a common identity, how much religious diversity was possible within one army, as late ninth-century Frankish and English kings began to tie Viking leaders into political alliances with the bond of baptism? And how (and when) could the army members’ traditional religious practices have been transformed into Christian living?

Traduction de la rédaction (Agathe Piotrowski)

Au cours de l’époque viking (des années 790 jusqu’au milieu/fin du XIe siècle), des unités mobiles composées de guerriers, de leurs familles, et d’autres individus non combattants ont constitué une présence régulière en France, en Angleterre et en Irlande. Les premiers groupes vikings armés étaient très différents de ceux qui conquirent l’Angleterre en 1016. Mon principal angle d’étude pour cet atelier porte sur le milieu et la fin du IXe siècle, à une époque où de nombreuses armées vikings ont passé des années loin de leur pays d’origine. Il s’agissait d’entités indépendantes, non rattachées à un État, à la recherche de richesses et de pouvoir, qui existaient au sein d’un paysage politiquement varié, qui se séparaient puis se regroupaient quand nécessaire, tout en nouant et brisant des alliances avec les pouvoirs locaux.

Il est difficile, bien que nécessaire, de distinguer ces groupes armés de leurs compatriotes qui colonisèrent la Normandie ou le Danelaw anglais. Malheureusement, il n’existe aucun témoignage issu directement de ces armées, les Scandinaves de cette époque n’ayant pas écrit de textes longs. Par conséquent, seule la vision chrétienne des événements nous est parvenue grâce à des annales, des vies des saints et d’autres sources narratives. Cependant, les preuves matérielles, qui ont considérablement augmenté ces dernières années, nous aident à réviser notre compréhension de ces armées. Les sources chrétiennes soulignent bien sûr le caractère agressif des vikings, mais l’archéologie révèle progressivement leur aspect plus pacifique, impliquant le troc et autres interactions non violentes avec les populations locales. Tout particulièrement, les fouilles de Repton, Torksey et ARSNY (« A Riverine Site in North Yorkshire ») ont mis au jour dans le nord de l’Angleterre des camps d’hivernage occupés par ce que l’on appelle habituellement la « Grande Armée » (entre 865 et 880). Il est, selon moi, impossible de nier le caractère violent des activités des vikings. Mais les découvertes archéologiques montrent désormais que, une fois dans leurs camps, les membres de ces armées se livraient à des activités variées : ils fabriquaient des artefacts métalliques, par exemple des lingots, réparaient des bateaux et des armes, jouaient et pariaient, faisaient du troc en utilisant des lingots et des pièces (dont certaines vraisemblablement frappées par eux).

Ma communication lors de l’atelier visait à redonner vie à ces sites de camps vikings du IXe siècle en prenant en compte la dimension sociale de ces armées. Il s’agissait de comprendre à quel point ces groupes, bien que sur la route et éloignés de leur foyer depuis des décennies, reflétaient les structures socio-politiques de leur pays d’origine, et comment ceux-ci ont su s’adapter à la vie en déplacement. Cet exercice était très spéculatif.

L’un des aspects considérés a été le fonctionnement interne de ces microsociétés, en portant une attention particulière à l’emploi des serments en dehors des situations militaires et commerciales plus connues (autrement dit le fonctionnement quotidien d’une société de l’oralité, où le fait de témoigner par serment constituait un système de preuve légale). Même au sein d’armées, des disputes devaient être résolues, des litiges en matière de succession devaient être réglés, des compensations calculées et payées : il convient de se demander si un expert légal était désigné, si un endroit était aménagé pour les assemblées et affaires juridiques au sein de ces camps temporaires. En effectuant une étude comparative avec la Scandinavie, nous pouvons nous demander si la liberté individuelle était plus limitée au sein des armées nomades que dans leur patrie.

Un autre thème à prendre en compte est celui de la religion et de la manière dont, en l’absence d’infrastructures développées et utilisées par les populations dans leur pays d’origine (les sites de cultes régionaux et les lieux de sépulture ancestraux, par exemple), les pratiques religieuses traditionnelles continuaient d’être observées dans le cadre de l’armée. J’ai débattu des plusieurs aspects de la vie quotidienne où la religion entrait en jeu, notamment au cours de sacrifices (dont témoignent les dépôts d’armes et autres vestiges matériels), de serments, de rituels célébrant les naissances, les mariages, et les décès (les découvertes issues du charnier de Repton suggèrent que les bandes armées ont inventé de nouveaux rituels en l’absence de cimetières familiaux traditionnels), par le biais d’amulettes ou grâce à la poésie scaldique (poèmes sur des dieux et des déesses associés à des valeurs martiales). Esquisser les contours d’une vie religieuse à partir de cette documentation soulève plusieurs questions. Si une religion commune permet le renforcement d’une identité collective, quel était le degré possible de diversité religieuse au sein d’une seule armée, alors même que les Francs et les Anglo-Saxons de la fin du IXe siècle commençaient à former des alliances politiques avec les chefs vikings par le biais du baptême ? Et comment (et quand) les pratiques religieuses traditionnelles des membres de l’armée ont-elles évolué pour laisser place au christianisme ?

Select bibliography

Abrams L., “The Scandinavian Encounter with Christianity Overseas: Diplomatic Conversions in the Ninth and Tenth Centuries”, in A. Pedersen and S. Sindbæk (eds.), Proceedings of the 18th Viking Congress (forthcoming 2019).

Biddle M. and Kjølbye-Biddle B., “Repton and the ‘Great Heathen Army’, 873-4’, in J. Graham-Campbell et al. (eds.), Vikings and the Danelaw. Select Papers from the Proceedings of the Thirteenth Viking Congress, Oxford, 200, p. 45-96.

Hadley D. M. and Richards J. D., “In Search of the Viking Great Army: Beyond the Winter Camps”, Medieval Settlement Research,33, 2018, p. 1-17.

Jarman C. L. et al., “The Viking Great Army in England: New Dates from the Repton Charnel’, Antiquity, 92, 2018, p. 183-199.

Price N., “Ship-Men and Slaughter-Wolves: Pirate Polities in the Viking Age”, in L. Müller and S. Amirell (eds.), Persistent Piracy: Historical Perspectives on Maritime Violence and State Formation, Basingstoke, 2014, p. 51-68.

Raffield B., “Bands of Brothers: A Re-appraisal of the Viking Great Army and its Implications for the Scandinavian Colonization of England”, Early Medieval Europe, 24, 2016, p. 308-337.

Raffield B., “‘A River of Knives and Swords’: Ritually Deposited Weapons in English Watercourses and Wetlands during the Viking Age”, European Journal of Archaeology, 17, 2014, p. 634-655.

Riisøy A. I., “Performing Oaths in Eddic Poetry: Viking Age Fact or Medieval Fiction?’, in Debating the Thing in the North: The Assembly Project II – Journal of the North Atlantic,special volume 8, 2016, p. 141-156.

Williams G., A Riverine Site Near York: A Possible Viking Camp? (forthcoming 2019).

Williams G., “Corpus des objets vikings découverts en France”, in É. Ridel (ed.), Les vikings dans l’empire franc. Impact, heritage, imaginaire,Bayeux, 2014, p. 130-135.


Comment citer cet article : Lesley Abrams, « Social and religious life in Viking armies / La vie sociale et religieuse au sein des armées vikings », dans Gautier A. (dir.), Bandes de guerriers et clientèles armées de l’Antiquité tardive à la Renaissance, Les Échos du Craham, 07/05/2019, [en ligne] https://craham.hypotheses.org/2131, ISSN : 2552-3139.


Vous aimerez aussi...

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur comment les données de vos commentaires sont utilisées.